Travel Books – FROM NEWS https://fromnews.info FROM NEWS DAILY Sun, 13 Jun 2021 05:43:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://fromnews.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/FROM-NEWS-e1601499615298-150x150.png Travel Books – FROM NEWS https://fromnews.info 32 32 Elder Scrolls Skyrim Redguard Race Guide | CBR – CBR – Comic Book Resources https://fromnews.info/elder-scrolls-skyrim-redguard-race-guide-cbr-cbr-comic-book-resources/ Sun, 13 Jun 2021 05:43:25 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=8009 Elder Scrolls Skyrim Redguard Race Guide |  CBR - CBR - Comic Book Resources

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim features 10 playable races. Among them are the Red Guards, fierce warriors who hail from the desert province of Hammerfell and come from the lost continent of Yokuda. With Hammerfell being the most inhospitable part of Tamriel, the Red Guards are known for their ferocity and excel in any activity […]

The post Elder Scrolls Skyrim Redguard Race Guide | CBR - CBR - Comic Book Resources first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Elder Scrolls Skyrim Redguard Race Guide |  CBR - CBR - Comic Book Resources

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim features 10 playable races. Among them are the Red Guards, fierce warriors who hail from the desert province of Hammerfell and come from the lost continent of Yokuda. With Hammerfell being the most inhospitable part of Tamriel, the Red Guards are known for their ferocity and excel in any activity that requires a high level of endurance.

Redguards are mostly of average size, well muscled, and their skin tone ranges from fairly light-skinned to dark-skinned, with hair texture ranging from thick and wavy to tightly curled. With their natural mastery of all weapons and their ability to destroy and change spells, Red Guards are great magic swords with a talent for one-on-one combat. Here are some tips on how to use their race and ability bonuses to your advantage.

Related: 10 Games to Play if you have Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla. loved

History of the Red Guards

When Yokuda, the former continent of the Red Guards, sank into the ocean around 1E 792, the surviving Yokudans (Red Guards) sailed east to settle in Hammerfell. Some Yokudan warriors known as Ra Gada began to roam the mainland in 1E 808, conquering tribes and driving off the Orsimers, which eventually earned the name Redguard. They remained a largely closed culture and did not begin trading high rock until they shared a common enemy with the Bretons with the Ors of Orsinium and eventually replaced their Yokudan language to facilitate the trade.

Civil war broke out in Hammerfell after tensions rose between the crowns, who favored traditional Yokudan culture, and the ancestors, descendants of the Ra Gada, who wanted to stay close to the rest of Tamriel for commercial and political reasons. After the death of the Red Guard King Thassadd II, the efforts of the Crowns fell on the ancestors supported by the Emperor, and Hammerfell became part of the Septim Empire.

Similar: The Elder Scrolls: Skyrim – How to Build a Successful Nord Character

During the Third Era, the War of Bend’r-Mahk, some of the cities of the Crowns were overrun by the north around 3E 397, with the ancestors not supporting the resistance as they were not answered when the Camoran Usurper marched north to after to conquer land with the liberation of Valenwood from the Steptim Empire. The Red Guards of the East harbored a grudge against the Nords after the war and tried in vain to reclaim land.

In the Fourth Era, Emperor Titus Mede II refused to cede land from southern Hammerfell to the Aldmeri Dominion, which broke out the Great War. However, after the Thalmor won, the Empire signed rights to occupy parts of Tamriel in the White Gold Concordat 4E 175, angering the Red Guards, who refused and continued the fight against the Thalmor. With the success of the Red Guards, they repelled the invasion of the Dominion and the Second Treaty of Stros M’kai was signed 4E 180, pulling the Thalmor away from Hammerfell. The Red Guards remained bitter against the Empire for betraying them, claiming the Concordat was a mistake in the Empire’s name.

Related: The Elder Scrolls: Skyrim – How to Build a Successful Khajiit Character

Red Guards popular bonuses

The Red Guards’ unique ability is that they are 50% resistant to poison. Any poison given out by enemies like Chaurus, Forsworn, and Spiders will have less effect and fewer side effects from alchemy testing or damage stamina regeneration from drinking alcoholic beverages. This isn’t as useful as some other races, but is still beneficial when exploring areas like Blackreach or The Reach.

The popular power of a Red Guard is an adrenaline rush, an endurance version of the Argon Histkin. When activated, Adrenaline Rush grants the player 10x stamina regeneration for 60 seconds and can only be activated once a day. The best time to use this power is during activities that use stamina, such as exercising. B. heavy blows against strong or multiple enemies at close range, when attempting to escape or when drawing a bow must be held longer than expected.

Related: The Elder Scrolls: 5 Skyrim Side Quests Every Player Should Complete

Redguards start with the same basic spells as all other races, flame and healing. As they are skilled warriors in both weapons and magic, their skill bonuses at the start of the game are +10 One-Handed (25 total starting levels), +5 Alternation (20), +5 Archery (20), +5 Block (20), + 5 destruction (20) and +5 forging (20). These bonuses make a Red Guard a great close and long range fighter, but it is recommended that they use either blades and magic or sword and shield instead of limiting their broad skills to archery or two-handed weapons.

Redguard build suggestions

At the beginning of the game it can be difficult to decide between the Warrior Stone or the Mage Stone for a Red Guard. Both stones have related abilities in which a redguard receives a starting bonus, but it largely depends on which fighting style the player will ultimately choose. Magic in each race is usually worked on later in the game, while combat is used from the start, so warrior stone choice is recommended. For a Red Guard and if the player is advanced enough in the game, it is recommended to visit the Lover Stone east of Markarth. If you select it, the player will receive a 15% skill bonus on all skills, perfect for a versatile fighter like a Red Guard.

A redguard is one of the most versatile races in the game, with adaptability in one-handed weapons, archery, and magic. Their starting bonus recommends taking a more defensive stance on their approach to combat with a shield, coupled with their extra stamina for extra punching power. An alternative to the defensive standpoint is the ability to toggle between destructive spells and one-handed weapons, with both options having a starting bonus for a Red Guard and covering both close-range and long-range combat.

See also: The Elder Scrolls: Skyrim – How to Build a Successful Bosmer Character

Without a bonus in any of the armor suits a Red Guard, whatever style the players prefer between light and heavy armor. Your characters are usually dressed in cloth or light clothing, so combining a Red Guard with light armor is more in line with the characteristics, but is not overly important for the playthrough. The armor should reflect the weapons. So if the player is taking a defensive stance with a shield, light armor is appropriate, but heavier armor is recommended if you have two weapons and are open to attack.

In terms of a Redguard’s skills, like their fighting style, they are adaptable and largely depend on the player’s preferred play style. It is best to avoid skills like Snakeblood, as the Redguard already has a high resistance to poisons. When the player is effectively using Adrenaline Rush, skills such as fighting stance are less useful. If you’re wielding a destruction spell and blade with two weapons, it would be useful to acquire skills like Novice Destruction, which means spells are cast for half the magicka, meaning they last longer, and Augmented Flames, Frost, or Shock that do more damage when cast.

Continue reading: The Elder Scrolls: The 5 Rarest Encounters in Skyrim

The Elder Scrolls: The 5 Rarest Encounters in Skyrim

About the author

Anastasia Owens
(36 published articles)

Anastasia Owens is a writer, gamer and animation student based in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She is currently attending Ulster University and producing ready-to-play 3D models and environments using software such as Autodesk Maya and Unreal Engine. She has been playing since her first Gamecube at the age of 3 and has developed a particular interest in open world gaming.

More from Anastasia Owens

The post Elder Scrolls Skyrim Redguard Race Guide | CBR - CBR - Comic Book Resources first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Line it is Drawn: Loki Time Travel Through Classic Comic Moments – CBR – Comic Book Resources https://fromnews.info/line-it-is-drawn-loki-time-travel-through-classic-comic-moments-cbr-comic-book-resources/ Sun, 13 Jun 2021 00:42:00 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=8000 Line it is Drawn: Loki Time Travel Through Classic Comic Moments - CBR - Comic Book Resources

This week our artists drew your suggestions for Loki on a journey back in time to classic comic book moments. That’s why I post a topic here every week. You reply on the CSBG twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply), our artists each choose one of your suggestions and I will post their […]

The post Line it is Drawn: Loki Time Travel Through Classic Comic Moments - CBR - Comic Book Resources first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Line it is Drawn: Loki Time Travel Through Classic Comic Moments - CBR - Comic Book Resources

This week our artists drew your suggestions for Loki on a journey back in time to classic comic book moments.

That’s why I post a topic here every week. You reply on the CSBG twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply), our artists each choose one of your suggestions and I will post their drawings here every week based on your suggestions. So you have a new question every week and see the choices from the previous week.

To qualify, you must follow @csbg when you answer – so follow us and then provide your answer to the question / challenge below (All suggestions are due by 8:59 a.m. Pacific Sunday).

The topic next week …

In honor of Father’s Day, suggest cartoon dads and their children celebrate the day in every possible way.

Read on for the drawings courtesy of the last question / challenge!

In honor of Loki’s new TV series, name a key moment in comic book history that Loki loves to travel through time to interrupt.

Enjoy!

I’ll arrange them alphabetically by the person who made the suggestion (with one exception).

All copyrights and trademarks of the following marks are with their respective owners.

Keith suggested Alan Morgan

The burglar runs into Loki and the security guard catches him while Spider-Man does nothing.

Nick Perks is the artist for this. Here is his website.

BackintheBronze suggested

The death of Jean Gray.

This drawing is by Jorge Santamaria. His website is here.

BackintheBronze and Daviddwwilliams suggested

Peter Parker was bitten by the radioactive spider.

This drawing is by Kimberly Hinrichs. Your website is here.

BigMike20X6 suggested

Loki meets Loki, around 1949

This drawing is by Morgan Blunt. His website is here.

BigMike20X6 suggested

Days of the future past

Seni Oyewole made this drawing. Here is his website.

Keith suggested Alan Morgan

Loki puts up diversion signs so the Kents never find baby Kal-El.

Nick Perks is also the artist for this. Here is his website.

Click here to enlarge the picture.

melodrakitch1 suggested

Shazam strengthens Billy Batson and exchanges one of the gods with L for Loki’s cunning.

This drawing is from Adam Star Ruvola. His website is here.

Click here to enlarge the picture.

MisterDoctor5 suggested

Wolverine and Hulk’s first fight

This drawing is by David Winters. His website is here.

MisterDoctor5 suggested

The night Gwen Stacey died

This drawing is by Afizeth Art. His website is here.

Werfalke1 suggested

Peter Parker meets Mary Jane

Axel Medellin drew this. His website is here.

Great job everyone! If these are the different timelines, I don’t want to be on the right ones!

Okay guys, suggest some ideas for the next week!

Power Rangers destroys the trust between a powerful morphine hero and his team

About the author

Brian Cronin
(14741 articles published)

CBR Senior Writer Brian Cronin has been a professional comic writer for CBR for over a dozen years (primarily through his Comics Should Be Good column series, including Comic Book Legends Revealed). He’s written two books on comics for Penguin-Random House – What Superman a Spy? And other comic book legends revealed and why does Batman wear shark protectants? And other amazing comic trivia! and a book, 100 Things X-Men Fans Should Know and Do Before They Die, by Triumph Books. His writing has been featured on ESPN.com, the Los Angeles Times, About.com, the Huffington Post, and Gizmodo. On his website, Legends Revealed, he introduces legends about entertainment and sports. Follow him on Twitter at @Brian_Cronin and email him suggestions for stories about comics you would like to see at brianc@cbr.com!

More from Brian Cronin

The post Line it is Drawn: Loki Time Travel Through Classic Comic Moments - CBR - Comic Book Resources first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
New book suggests Birx wanted Trump to lose the presidential election – CNN https://fromnews.info/new-book-suggests-birx-wanted-trump-to-lose-the-presidential-election-cnn/ Sat, 12 Jun 2021 19:40:42 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7997 New book suggests Birx wanted Trump to lose the presidential election - CNN

In Preventable, his new book detailing the federal government’s failure to contain the pandemic, Andy Slavitt writes that he met with Birx in Minnesota last August after briefing local officials. Once a close advisor to Trump, she was excluded from his inner circle at the time and was replaced by Dr. Scott Atlas, a radiologist […]

The post New book suggests Birx wanted Trump to lose the presidential election - CNN first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
New book suggests Birx wanted Trump to lose the presidential election - CNN

In Preventable, his new book detailing the federal government’s failure to contain the pandemic, Andy Slavitt writes that he met with Birx in Minnesota last August after briefing local officials. Once a close advisor to Trump, she was excluded from his inner circle at the time and was replaced by Dr. Scott Atlas, a radiologist with no epidemiological experience who Trump hired after seeing him on Fox News.

Aside from her once prominent role, Birx spent her days traveling the country providing detailed data to government officials. It was one of those meetings in Minnesota that she invited Slavitt to.

“I wanted to get a feel for whether, in the event of a tense change of government, it would help give Biden and his team the best possible chance of being effective,” writes Slavitt in his new book, although the outcome of the election was not yet known.

“At some point, after a short pause, she looked me in the eye and said, ‘I hope the election goes a certain way,'” writes Slavitt. “I had the most important information I needed.”

CNN asked Birx for a comment.

For the past six months, Slavitt has been Biden’s lead advisor on Covid-19 Response. This public position included regular television appearances and weekly briefings with reporters. Slavitt stepped down from that role on Thursday, citing a 130-day limit for special government officials. His new book, a copy of which CNN received, is out Tuesday.

Prior to serving in the Biden administration, Slavitt played a quieter role in responding to the pandemic as he watched Trump externally downplay it. Slavitt advised several officials while Trump was in office, including on phone calls with Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, urging them to take it more seriously and place more emphasis on testing.

During their interview last August, Birx Slavitt said she had been “completely silenced” and was banned from appearing in the national media. It was a sharp departure from Birx’s earlier proximity to Trump, which included regular briefings in front of reporters and private consultations in the Oval Office.

“Fighting the virus and Scott Atlas together is the hardest thing I had to do,” Birx said when she briefed officials with Slavitt in the room last August, he writes.

When her TV appearances were still being sanctioned by the White House, Birx once said that Trump was “so attentive to the scientific literature and the details and the data” and his “ability to analyze and integrate data” from “his long history in business. “She was sitting quietly in the meeting room when Trump suggested using disinfectants to treat Covid-19.

These moves often sparked strong criticism from public health officials who said Birx masked Trump’s unscientific statements while she provided cover for him. Others defended Birx, pointing to the long hours she spent collecting data that was used to make important decisions. In her conversation with Slavitt, Birx seemed to see the damage to her reputation.

“I have no illusions about my government career,” she told him.

“She was downright scared”

When Slavitt met Birx in Minnesota, she was still in her role as the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator. It would be months before Trump tested positive for coronavirus as he maintained a robust travel schedule and held several large White House gatherings, often during which guests and staff were masked off.

When he met Birx in August, Slavitt writes that “her early optimism was long gone”. “At the end of October 2020 she was beyond all that, she was downright scared,” he says.

Although Birx had indicated that she would be open to service in the Biden government after his election victory, she tacitly announced her resignation in December.

Slavitt previously worked in the Obama administration on the healthcare.gov website and also served as the deputy administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

He didn’t work in the White House during the Trump presidency, but was able to provide some insight into their handling of the pandemic, having been in contact with Kushner since April 2020. He privately advised Kushner to push back Trump’s self-imposition and postponed the reopening deadline from Easter when Kushner once told him states should be in charge of the tests.

“Some of them clearly do not want to succeed,” says Slavitt, Kushner told governors in April 2020. “Bad incentives to keep blaming us.”

Slavitt writes that he was in contact with several governors and Kushner said that was not true.

HHS boss had little influence on Trump, the book says

Slavitt also knew several of the most prominent health officials in the Trump administration, including then-US Secretary of Health Alex Azar, who reached out to Slavitt prior to his 2017 Senate hearing.

During that conversation, Slavitt asked Azar how he could push Trump back if necessary.

“The president and I have talked about it. And he knows that I have a strong will,” Azar told Slavitt, according to the book. CNN has approached Azar for comment.

Azar was one of the first health officials to warn Trump about Covid-19 in January 2020. However, his tenure as head of the department that would be crucial to the federal government’s response was marked by chaos and power struggles. It also showed how little influence Azar had over the president.

Slavitt writes that Azar oversaw “a number of non-enforced errors”, including the early problems and limitations within the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on testing, citing a former senior administration official who told him that Azar Seema Verma was almost fired and replaced by a CMS administrator.

Slavitt also writes that Vice President Mike Pence’s communications director, Katie Miller, issued an instruction in March 2020 that “HHS must not issue communications of concern to the public.” After Azar suggested that the US situation was under control “but could change quickly,” Miller vigorously dismissed the proposed statement and withdrew Azar from appearing on “Fox & Friends” the next morning. In February, Pence officials attempted to streamline messaging by instructing all officers to coordinate declarations through their office. Miller told CNN that this policy is not specific to Azar. But Slavitt writes in his book that one was addressed to him.

“He was banned from doing media for 45 days,” Slavitt writes despite being HHS secretary while a pandemic spread rapidly around the world.

The post New book suggests Birx wanted Trump to lose the presidential election - CNN first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Summer Reading Guide: Mysteries, Memoirs, Duran Duran, and More – Columbia Daily Tribune https://fromnews.info/summer-reading-guide-mysteries-memoirs-duran-duran-and-more-columbia-daily-tribune/ Sat, 12 Jun 2021 14:39:59 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7994 Summer Reading Guide: Mysteries, Memoirs, Duran Duran, and More - Columbia Daily Tribune

The official start of summer is just around the corner, and despite the increased travel options, there are few travel destinations that can accommodate losing yourself in a great book. Here are just a few of the titles I’ve bookmarked for summer reading. Most are new to the season, while some are noticeable in certain […]

The post Summer Reading Guide: Mysteries, Memoirs, Duran Duran, and More - Columbia Daily Tribune first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Summer Reading Guide: Mysteries, Memoirs, Duran Duran, and More - Columbia Daily Tribune

The official start of summer is just around the corner, and despite the increased travel options, there are few travel destinations that can accommodate losing yourself in a great book.

Here are just a few of the titles I’ve bookmarked for summer reading. Most are new to the season, while some are noticeable in certain ways.

More than memoirs

When are memoirs more than memoirs? When it opens up beyond one life and illuminates the lives of others or broader parts of culture. Technically, Hanif is Abdurraqib’s newest, “A little devil in America” is not a memoir. The subtitle of the book reveals the content and scope: “Notes in Praise of Black Performance”. But Abdurraqib is one of our best writers when it comes to making personal and cultural almost indistinguishable.

Abdurraqib is one of our best writers. As a brilliant poet, essayist, and cultural critic, he deals with nostalgia, pop culture, blackness, and friendship in a way that few writers can. Here he examines Black America’s changing views on Whitney Houston, the death of Michael Jackson, the spiritual properties of dancing, Afrofuturism, and more. The early chapter “Sixteen Ways of Looking at Blackface” is a deeply human piece of virtuoso writing. Longer dispatches are interrupted by lyrical, mind-expanding pieces that refresh the soul and remind readers that there is little that Abdurraqib cannot do.

Michelle Zauner is best known for her music, which she makes under the name Japanese Breakfast. With her memoir, Michelle Zauner makes a wonderful, safe debut “Crying at H Mart.” An exquisite combination of voluptuous sensory memories and aching substance characterizes Zauner’s prose as she draws the veil over her personal experience as a Korean-American. Zauner cleverly uses food, rituals, and the occasional clash of cultures to describe the depth of her connection with her mother and the special joys – and dilemmas – of growing up between worlds.

Cultural deep dives

The Daniel Boone Regional Library’s September One Read programming revolves around Casey Ceps stunning “Mad hours.” Why not get ahead and read along as literary icon Harper Lee sifts through a real-life mystery of race, religion, local politics, and murder in 1970s Alabama. Cep writes with all the rigor of a journalist and the magnetized sense of detail and lust of a novelist.

Annie Zaleski, a journalist with St. Louis connections, offers a refreshing addition to the prestigious 33 1/3 series that essentially takes the reader through biographies of classic or otherwise noteworthy albums. Zaleski’s keen ear guided her “Duran Duran’s Rio,“A pop gem from 1982 that swirls with color and life. If social media is any clue, the book will land with die-hard Duran Duran fans – and has the potential to give unfamiliar reasons to leave the set to worry about the touchstones like “Hungry Like the Wolf.”

New tariff

Will Leitch can be described in several ways. Experienced sports journalist and film critic. Founder of Deadspin. One of America’s loudest St. Louis Cardinals fans. Leitch refreshes his work as a novelist “How happy, “out now. The book, which was praised early on by the likes of Stephen King and Richard Russo, finds a new way into a story with” rear window “-like outlines.

Protagonist Daniel tries to convince anyone who listens that he has witnessed what happened to a missing young woman; It will be an uphill battle to get others to leave behind the chronic illness that has left him in a wheelchair. Russo highlighted the voice Leitch created for Daniel and wrote, “I’m not sure if it will ever leave my head entirely or if I want it to.”

Many mid-Missouri-based writers make their mark nationwide. Perhaps few writers had the youngest reach of novelist Laura McHugh, whose “What happens in the dark” will be released on June 22nd. McHugh’s writing understands the dark fabric of the lower Midwest and the Ozarks and gathers the threads that bind the good-hearted, unlucky, and idiot. Her latest is the delicate case of a young Arkansas woman who has to relive her own abduction to help the police with an all-too-familiar investigation.

Matt Bell goes back several hundred years in his extensive environmental novel – and goes a thousand years further “Apple seeds”, out next month. If any writer manages to unite past, present and distant future while addressing the fundamentals of human existence and the erosion of the earth that nourishes us, it is the thoughtful Bell.

Poetry, poetry, poetry!

A number of world-class poets have already published books this summer – or will soon be, including Michael Kleber-Diggs (“Worldly Things”, which came out June 8), Amorak Huey and Todd Kaneko (“Slash / slash”, until June 15), Alina Stefanescu (“Pain,” July), Taylor Byas (“Blood warmth, “July) and Kaveh Akbar (“Pilgrim bell”, “August).

Several publications in 2021 combine new or unpublished poems with the canonical work of brilliant writers. “The glass constellation” is a thorough, deeply satisfying look at the career of acclaimed Sino-American poet Arthur Sze. The book combines almost 40 pages of freshly written texts with existing pieces from the years 1972 to 2019.

“The Essential June Jordan” is an appropriate celebration of the late poet who died in 2002 at the age of 65. The book is everything Jordan was – righteous, seditiously funny, deceptively tender. Pulitzer winner and youngest guest of the Unbound Book Festival, Jericho Brown, adds an afterword.

Aarik Danielsen is the Tribune’s Features and Culture Editor. Contact him at adanielsen@columbiatribune.com or by phone at 573-815-1731.

The post Summer Reading Guide: Mysteries, Memoirs, Duran Duran, and More - Columbia Daily Tribune first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
David Brooks: Building Trust: A Practical Guide – TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press https://fromnews.info/david-brooks-building-trust-a-practical-guide-twincities-com-pioneer-press/ Sat, 12 Jun 2021 09:37:45 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7988 David Brooks: Building Trust: A Practical Guide - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

Mistrust is a cancer that is eating away at our society. It increases enmity, stifles cooperation, and encourages conspiracy. So the question is, how do you build trust? Within organizations, trust is typically built by leaders who create environments that encourage people to behave with integrity, competence, and benevolence. It’s not just a question of […]

The post David Brooks: Building Trust: A Practical Guide - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
David Brooks: Building Trust: A Practical Guide - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press

Mistrust is a cancer that is eating away at our society. It increases enmity, stifles cooperation, and encourages conspiracy. So the question is, how do you build trust?

Within organizations, trust is typically built by leaders who create environments that encourage people to behave with integrity, competence, and benevolence.

It’s not just a question of character, but also of having the right practical skills – knowing what to do in complex situations so that people feel respected and safe. Here are some practices leaders use in their companies and organizations to build trust:

Assume excellence.

The more you monitor your employees’ behavior, the more suspicious they become and the more suspicious they become. Executives who trust their employees may tell them what to do, but they let them manage their own schedules and fulfill their responsibilities in their own way. In the 1980s, Hewlett-Packard allowed engineers to take equipment home without much formal paperwork because they were sure they would bring it back.

Be more human.

Many of us over 45 were raised to separate our personal and professional lives. This distinction is less recognized by younger generations who want to put their whole selves into work and be open to emotions, mental health problems, and other personal matters.

A few years ago the interns on a team I was leading told me they didn’t really feel like they knew each other and wanted to spend an afternoon sharing their childhood photos. At first I thought it was ridiculous, but we did it and it was right. We have created new levels of vulnerability and emotional attachment. Northwestern’s Janice Nadler found that negotiators who spent only five minutes chatting about non-professional matters prior to a negotiation felt more cooperative, shared more information, and developed more confidence in subsequent communication.

No back-channel convictions

Many schools, businesses, and organizations have become snake pits of suspicion because leaders have allowed some in the community to convict others online without ever sitting in a room with the accused and speaking it out. Once this behavior becomes acceptable, the toughest people in the organization take over and everyone else ducks.

Discourage cliques

A team that has split into different subcultures becomes a team in which mistrust thrives. Mix people together so they don’t split up into cliques.

Don’t overestimate transparency.

There is a popular belief that when you make your company’s operations more visible to outsiders, people trust you. This is mostly wrong. Confidence in the government collapsed in 1976 when the federal government passed the Sunshine Act to increase transparency. then it went back further. A 2011 study suggests that when ordinary citizens are given more information about how a public health system allocates its resources, their overall trust in the health system is weakened compared to those who are not given any information about the decision making process.

Maximum feasible vulnerability.

Mistakes, paradoxically, are opportunities to build trust as long as you admit mistakes and are clear about what you have learned and what you are doing to change yourself. Successful times can undermine confidence when leaders dress and promote themselves. This behavior appears selfish – and therefore trust-destroying.

Admit social ignorance.

Approximately 95% of the MBA students in Roderick Kramer’s negotiation courses say they are above average in their ability to assess the honesty, trustworthiness, and reliability of other people. The fact is, as research by William Ickes of the University of Texas at Arlington has shown, we are not always that good at understanding what is going on in the minds of others. People who feel wrong and misunderstood will not trust you.

The only solution is to keep asking people what they think and what dilemmas they are facing. Often times we send social signals that are too subtle to be received. Be explicit.

Give away power.

In times when there is great distrust, power hierarchies are usually suspect. Leaders gain trust by spreading authority among the ranks. In his book “The Power of Giving Away Power”, Matthew Barzun contrasts pyramidal hierarchical structures with constellation structures in which power is distributed. Pyramid structures encourage a competitive, win-lose mindset, he writes, while constellation structures encourage collaboration.

Answer mistrust with confidence.

People who have learned to distrust will resist your friendship because they assume that you will eventually betray them. If you keep showing up for them after they reject you, it will eventually change their life.

In diverse societies, it is more difficult to build trust. Over the past decade we have learned that our social skills are insufficient for the complex society in which we live. Hence, dwindling interpersonal trust has emerged as one of the greatest threats to America’s future.

Restoring trust is not about good intentions; it’s about concrete behavior.

David Brooks writes a column for the New York Times.

The post David Brooks: Building Trust: A Practical Guide - TwinCities.com-Pioneer Press first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Guide: Record shops to hit up on Long Island in time for Record Store Day – GreaterMoriches https://fromnews.info/guide-record-shops-to-hit-up-on-long-island-in-time-for-record-store-day-greatermoriches/ Sat, 12 Jun 2021 04:36:34 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7985 Guide: Record shops to hit up on Long Island in time for Record Store Day - GreaterMoriches

Last year, vinyl LPs and EPs outsold CDs for the first time since 1986. This trend was unthinkable 25 years ago. By the turn of the century, vinyl appeared in the twilight of its years and seemingly marked for death. Cassettes and CDs dealt devastating blows to the format and it shied away to irrelevancy […]

The post Guide: Record shops to hit up on Long Island in time for Record Store Day - GreaterMoriches first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Guide: Record shops to hit up on Long Island in time for Record Store Day - GreaterMoriches

Last year, vinyl LPs and EPs outsold CDs for the first time since 1986.

This trend was unthinkable 25 years ago.

By the turn of the century, vinyl appeared in the twilight of its years and seemingly marked for death. Cassettes and CDs dealt devastating blows to the format and it shied away to irrelevancy in the digital age. But it never reached extinction. The 12 inch 33 1/3 rpm vinyl LP has lived to see its 90th birthday this year.

Some may be quick to dismiss vinyl’s newfound popularity as a hipster trend. However, it’s not simply the number of vinyl records sold that indicates its permeation into the mainstream; it’s where it is being sold.

Department stores like Kohl’s, Target and Walmart have sold vinyl records for a number of years, the later of which launched its own “Vinyl Mania Week” last month, during which it sold exclusive releases, primarily color variants of popular titles.

On June 1, Rough Trade, a UK-based independent record store group with shops in the US, moved its New York location out of chic gentrified Williamsberg, and into the ground floor of the 30 Rock building, NBC’s cultural hub of broadcasting and mainstream late night entertainment in the heart of Midtown Manhattan.

While big players have found ways to ride vinyl’s newfound success, small mom-and-pop shops brimming with used vinyl records is what kept the format alive.

Suffolk County is home to nine of such shops at the forefront of the 21st century revinylization. From multigenerational family businesses to players starting out in the past decade, these stores are reacquainting experienced islanders with vinyl and introducing it to those born and raised in the information age.

Some of Suffolk’s shop owners think Record Store Day deserves some of the credit for vinyl’s survival and booming independent record store sales.

The holiday began in 2008 as an way to drive music consumers back into independently owned record stores. On Record Store Day, indie music shops receive vinyl releases, as well as some CDs and cassettes, exclusive to their stores. Lines wrap around the shops for colored vinyl, picture discs, new remasters, first-time vinyl pressings and long sought out-of-print rarities, all of which are generally limited to a few thousand copies.

The celebration of mom-and-pop shops is typically a single Saturday in April. There is also a RSD Black Friday event, in which indie stores receive another batch of exclusive titles the day after Thanksgiving. Last year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the releases intended for April were spread out over three RSD Drop Days. This year there will be two dates: June 12 and July 17.

A complete list of titles that will be available on these dates can be accessed here.

We’ve rounded up the record stores around Suffolk County in time for the first RSD drop. While three of the shops on this list will not carry RSD titles, all of these stores are worthy of a visit.

Record Stop (Patchogue): Best for new LPs and 45s

There are two kinds of crowds that pour into Record Stop just off Patchogue’s W. Main St.

The first are shoppers of all ages looking to score the newest releases pressed on wax and scrounge around the shop’s used bins.

The second are the bar-hopers and dinner-daters who begin to spill in after 6 p.m., according to two of the shop’s employees. “The night crowd peruses,” Izzy said from behind the shop’s counter. “It’s as if it’s an art exhibit or a museum.”

Despite the 21st century vinyl resurgence, record shops, particularly those in walkable areas like Patchogue, encounter many passers-through unware that record stores still exist and that plants pump out new pressing of old albums. “They don’t understand that they never stopped pressing vinyl,” Kap, one of Record Stop’s managers, said, toiling at an office desk brimming with used records.

Each of the store’s employees know a lot about a little, according to Kap. He is a self-professed soul, reggae, and hip-hop head, while Izzy is well-versed in 70s rock. They help guide customers looking for new discoveries in their respective expertise.

The mid-size shop is Record Stop’s third location change since it first opened in Lake Ronkonkoma in 1974. The floor space is dominated by new LPs, with used LPs and CDs shunted to the walls and endcaps. The store’s organization and display method for new 45s is its standout feature and surpasses that of other shops, where they tend to be sequestered in a separate section. At Record Stop, the shrink-wrapped seven-inch records occupy natural wooden cubbies mounted to the front of the LP bins of corresponding genres throughout the store.

Record Stop is a wholesaler, and as such, offers many items at slashed prices under the “Vinyl under $20” tab on its website.

The Patchogue shop, one of the company’s two brick-and-mortar locations, the other in Charleston, South Carolina, offers sales as well. On the twentieth of each month, 13 new LPs make their way to the bestsellers wall shelf, where they are discounted for $20. In the past, the wall has boasted a myriad of repressed classics, from Nirvana’s “Nevermind” to “Led Zeppelin II” and Nas’ “Illmatic” to Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue.” This month, the wall boasts Judas Priest’s “Painkiller,” Lana Del Ray’s “Born to Die,” Nina Simone’s “Little Girl Blue,” and 10 others.

Record Store Day veterans and ordinary Patchogue Villagers are likely familiar with Record Stop’s celebration of the holiday. From lines around the block, to eating and drinking in the street all scored by live performances, the shop pulls out all the stops. Last year however, the shop limited its celebrated due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Record Stop will carry RSD releases this year, but the shop has yet to announce the extent of its festivities for either drop day.

Sunday Records (Riverhead): Best for trying new things and new wave nostalgia

As the name may imply, Sunday Records is only open on Sundays. Owner Brian Volkman, a lawyer by trade, works during the week. He said the Riverhead shop, which opened its doors is 2018, is more of a low-pressure hobby than a business.

A frequent record store shopper in his youth, Volkman said he enjoyed getting home from a record store with new albums he had never even heard of before. His goal is to instill his passion for discovery in his customer.

“I can always sell a copy of Dark Side of the Moon, or A Night at the Opera,” he said. “But I want people to get beyond that and really dig into the crates and discover new music.”

Volkman foments this discovery through the help of Universe Publishing’s “1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.” The three-inch-thick reference book is open for customers to read and learn about music beyond their purview. Any of the book’s albums that Volkman has in-stock are marked with a “1001 Albums” sticker so customers can read up on the release before they purchase.

To turn customers on to new music, Volkman attaches print-outs of various reviews directly on the album.

Sunday Records is one of two stores on this list that has a listening station with a turntable and headphones, completed by a leather chair so clients can listen comfortably before they make their purchase.

The small shop is the most curiously organized of all the entries on this list. All the artists are arranged according to the Long Island radio stations Volkman would tune into growing up on Long Island.

Screamers of the Week in chronological order

“If I wanna hear Led Zeppelin of Pink Floyd, I’ll turn up WBAB,” he said. “I want to hear anything new or more mainstream rock, I’ll turn on WEHM.” The former section resides on the left-hand wall, with the latter placed in the middles of the shop.

The New Yorkers who dared to be different in the decade after disco will feel nostalgia at the sight of the 45s that veneer the right hand wall, boasting Talking Heads, U2, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts and yellow and purple Sire Records labels. This is the WLIR section, honoring the station that helped introduce the nation to all sounds punk and new wave.

The station was famous for its “Screamers of the week,” tracks nominated by its staffers and decided after listeners called in their votes. Volkman has print-outs of all the station’s Screamers from 1980 to 1997 available in the store, and each screamer in the shop has a numbered sticker boasting when that hit was crowed victorious.

More Screamers

Sunday Records will not participate in Record Store Day. But if anyone asks Volkman, “every Sunday is Record Store Day.”

Looney Tunes (West Babylon): Best for nick nacks and autographs

From its inventory to its decorum, West Babylon’s Looney Tunes is a necessary pilgrimage for Long Island metal heads.

The entirety of the store’s first two aisles are devoted to metal CDs, and there is no shortage of metal found on freshly lathed wax.

Puzzles up top, thrash, speed and extreme down below.

The 50-year-old shop is famous for housing live performances and in-person signings. “That’s been pretty much a backbone of our operation the last 25 years,” said Karl Groeger Jr, who, alongside his brother Jamie, owns and operates the shop his father started.

Groeger Jr. said he hopes to get back to in-person autographs this summer.

Supporting evidence of these star-studded events are plastered throughout the store. The red walls and supporting pillars around the shop are adorned with autographed acoustic and electric guitars and signed LPs grace a beam which runs the length of the store.

Most of the signatures come from world-renowned metal acts, from Ozzy Osborne, to Megadeth, and Slipknot, to Slayer, the later of which is no longer visible. A Stratocaster that once bore the names of Tom Araya and Kerry King was engulfed in a fire at Looney Tunes’ previous location. Its blackened and melted remains are on display nonetheless at the entryway of the shop.

Every aisle and wall is also overrun with Funko pops, ReAction figures, t-shirts, posters, puzzles, books, mugs and a wealth of other giftable novelty items for any music fan.

Pulled from the shop’s bins, these classic albums, like Looney Tunes, turn 50 this year.

Long Island’s largest record store in terms of square feet, Looney Tunes will carry RSD titles this year. It is also the islands oldest record store, celebrating its gold anniversary this year. Groeger has yet to set a date and announce festivities, but said he plans to have a celebration this summer or fall, and teased that “some really big, legendary artist is doing a free show for us.”

Mr. Cheapo CD and Record Exchange (Commack): Best for CDs

Completists pining for a foreign edition of their favorite CD with an exclusive bonus track or a bootleg show of their favorite band will likely find it in Mr. Cheapo’s CD bins, which inhabit a wall the full length of the shop, plus floor bins.

The stockpile of CDs is but one of the changes the Goldman family’s record store underwent during its 40-year-history. Stu Goldberg started the shop in 1981 in Flushing Queens and named it after his wife’s nickname for him. They opened a Mineola location in 1983 and relocated the Queens location in 1986 to Commack in where it is today.

Josh Goldberg, Stu’s son, has worked in the shop since he was 13, and is now officially an owner of the shop. For four decades, Mr. Cheapo specialized in the buying and selling of CDs and second-hand vinyl. “The record business now is as good as when we started,” Josh said. “If not better.”

The young Goldberg remembers more difficult times and transitions, citing the burgeoning popularity of sharing and streaming music digitally in the early to mid 2000s as a “brutal.” “The main thing was it took away so much of the sales of CDs, which was our main driving force.”

Mr. Cheapo, these albums and Josh Goldberg himself all turn 40 this year.

By the end of the decade, the turntables turned. The RSD revinylization began, and Mr. Cheapo survived and even expanded. “We used to never carry new vinyl,” Goldberg said. “We used to have two rows, now we have 20 rows of new vinyl.”

Mr. Cheapo will carry RSD releases this year.

Record Reserve Inc. (Northport): Best for starting a used LP collection

Record Reserve Inc. in Northport is the smallest shop in Suffolk County, but the 10-year-old store still attracts a range of shoppers. “I’m catering to the deep collectors,” Tim Clair, the shop’s owner, said. “And the people who just wanna have fun with it and come in and buy a $5 record and enjoy the hobby.”

The spare space and single staffer, long-haired Clair in a black t-shirt and blue jeans, make for an inviting atmosphere, especially for new collectors that may feel intimidated in one of the larger, more populous stores.

On a recent Saturday afternoon, Clair, was visited by two of his newest regulars: a pair of 16-year-old boys who dusted off their parents collections and caught a knack for the wax. One of them was puzzled by a copy of A Hard Day’s Night he was considering adding to his collection. Clair then taught him the differences between the U.S. version of “A Hard Day’s Night,” which he was holding, and U.K. version to which he had been accustomed.

Clair, a life-long guitarist, aims to acquire, set-up and sell second-hand guitars in his shop soon. He is beginning to dip his toes in the secondary project, with two guitars hanging in the shop awaiting some TLC.

Record Reserve will not participate in Record Store Day.

Infinity Records (Massapequa Park): Best for puppies and kitties

After 31 years in the business, Infinity Records owner Joe Ostermeier said his biggest challenge is finding and retaining knowledgeable employees with expertise in various genres. “When customers come in a lot of them have questions. You can learn what their taste is, turn them onto music that fits their picture.”

He believes his current staffers in his Massapequa Park shop are up to the task. The mid-size store has a more expansive classical record stock than the other shops on this list. Luckily, for classical music expertise, as well as knowledge of jazz and psychedelia, he can introduce customers to Corey, one of the shops managers of more than 10 years.

The shop’s metal and punk wall boasts some interesting finds for collectors, including Ramones and Skid Row firsts prints, as well as a 12″ version of Iron Maiden’s “Women in Uniform” non-album single.

Infinity Records celebrates Record Store Day a little differently than the other shops on this list. Instead of offering sales or hosting live shows, Ostermeier said the store donates 10% of its proceeds from each RSD Saturday and the following Sunday to local no kill shelters.

“We do due diligence, so we actually check them out and make sure they’re legitimate,” he said of the shelters he chooses. “It’s something I do in memory of my parents. My parents were big animal advocates. So I just try to give back.”

This year, Infinity Records is donating to Last Hope, Inc. Animal Rescue & Rehabilitation in Wantagh and All About Cats Rescue in Freeport.

Ostermeier said the shop also gives away posters, buttons, t-shirts, CDs and DVDs throughout the weekend.

High Fidelity Records and CDs (Amityville): Best for weekly trips

Perhaps the most jam-packed of all the shops on the island, High Fidelity Records and CDs has served Amityville for 17 years.

Despite the scarce walk room, it is not uncommon to find a several of the shop’s several dozen regulars browsing the bins. The store’s backbone is its inventory of used vinyl and CDs. To help those on the prowl for a particular album and his regulars who like to keep up with his latest inventory, owner Marc Sendik puts his latest stock into 15 new arrival bins. After three weeks, he cycles those albums out into respective used sections to unveil fresh second-hand batches.

The store’s ever-growing inventory of used products is it’s backbone, but owner Sendik said he fulfills many requests for new releases, lately for millennials and zoomers. “Good music is good music no matter what generation its from,” Sendik said. “They’re buying a lot of Hendrix, Floyd and Zeppelin and stuff. But they’re also coming in for War on Drugs, The Black Keys, Greta Van Fleet, newer acts like that.”

Record stores were not immune to the COVID-19 pandemic, and Sendik says closing down during that time was the greatest challenge he faced as a business owner of nearly two decades. Like many of the islands shops, he digitized his inventory for online sales, shipped orders to customers’ homes and towards the end of his time closed down, fulfilled orders for curbside pickup.

High Fidelity will carry RSD releases this year and Sendik said he is offering 20% off all other new and used projects, including RSD titles from previous years.

Innersleeve Records (Amagansett): Best for a trip out east

For many Long Islanders, Innersleave Records is a bit out of reach for regular visits, and owner Greg Wright empathizes with them. He said he fairly compensates any westward islanders who travel to the island’s most eastern record store in Amagansett. “We’re out here in the sticks so we like to give a little extra incentive for coming the extra miles, the extra time,” he said. “And it’s beautiful, it’s a great day trip to take out here, not to mention the potential to rub shoulders with a celebrity or musician in here.”

After working in record stores since he was 12, Wright opened Innersleeve in 2012 and said he is looking to open a second location elsewhere on the island, an effort sidetracked by the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said the pandemic also made acquiring and maintaining inventory difficultly, an issue he had not experienced his first eight years in business. It also became difficult to acquire and sell second-hand guitars and new gear, and Wright closed the listening station he had set up for customers.

While most record stores on this list separate their stock of new and used records, ring worn old pressings and freshly wrapped new pressings of the same albums rest back to back in the same bin.

“We have found that people will sometimes surprise themselves and buy something they didn’t expect to buy because it was in front of them,” he said “I think its better mentally to see the full catalogue than to think you have to look in multiple places to get it all taken care of.”

Outside the shop, passers-by are welcome to take from the free record bin. They may not find the best selection there, as Wright explained it is filled with items he “can’t even get a buck for,” mostly beat-up easy-listening records. However, he said various community members find a way to turn the trash into treasure.

“We have a big artist community here and people grab covers and made artwork and collages,” Wright said “Somebody took records and painted them and put them up on all these telephone poles with different messages. Some people get really excited about it.”

Innersleeve Records will carry new RSD releases this year.

Vinyl Bay 777 (Plainview): Best for box sets

Despite the mural of artists and band logos painted on its front-facing roll-down doors, Vinyl Bay 777 is Suffolk County’s most elusive record store, located in a commercial lot detached from the road in Plainview. Its high ceilings house one of the county’s largest record collections.

The store is a must for those who collect lavish limited edition CD or Vinyl box sets, most of which are arranged at the counter just beyond the front door.

Frank Napoli, owner of Vinyl Bay 777, said his store focuses on vintage items of all formats, including cassettes and 8-tracks. While the shop is dimly lit, collectors can still find gems in throughout the massive collection, particularly in the punk section located just left of the door. On last look, it contained several hard-to-find first pressings of punk classics.

Napoli said his six-year-old shop’s large selection of new and used hip-hop records many of his younger shoppers purchase sets his store apart from other shops as well.

Vinyl Bay 777 will not participate in this year’s Record Store Day.

The post Guide: Record shops to hit up on Long Island in time for Record Store Day - GreaterMoriches first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Father’s Day Gift Tips: The 11 Best Cannabis Accessories – Forbes https://fromnews.info/fathers-day-gift-tips-the-11-best-cannabis-accessories-forbes/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 23:34:48 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7982 Father's Day Gift Tips: The 11 Best Cannabis Accessories - Forbes

This year, skip the tie and get the herb-loving fathers in your life a cannabis-themed Father’s Day gift. Choose from smoking accessories, storage solutions and other ideas to make enjoying the plant more fun and exciting, or choose good reading for dad to enjoy alone or with the kids. Invincibowl and Invincipole unbreakable bong downstems […]

The post Father's Day Gift Tips: The 11 Best Cannabis Accessories - Forbes first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Father's Day Gift Tips: The 11 Best Cannabis Accessories - Forbes

This year, skip the tie and get the herb-loving fathers in your life a cannabis-themed Father’s Day gift. Choose from smoking accessories, storage solutions and other ideas to make enjoying the plant more fun and exciting, or choose good reading for dad to enjoy alone or with the kids.

Invincibowl and Invincipole unbreakable bong downstems and heads.

Photo courtesy Invincibowl

Invincibowl and Invincipole A broken head or a broken shaft can be a definite bong session buzzkill. Avoid the problem with unbreakable parts for your favorite piece of smoke. The Invincibowl is made from aerospace grade aluminum, fits all 14mm joint bongs, and comes with a lifetime warranty. The Invincipole will never break during use or cleaning and is equipped with telescopic technology that allows you to easily adjust the length of the base between 3 “and 5”. Fits most 18mm bongs. Both are available online in five bright colors.

A group of friends enjoy cannabis with the laser-fired Hitoki Trident bong.

The Hitoki Trident laser fired bong.

Photo courtesy of Hitoki

Hitoki Trident Laserbong Gadget-loving dads will fall in love with the Trident laser-fired bong from Hitoki. The Trident’s patent-pending combustion system ignites the cannabis like a magnifying glass, concentrating the sun’s rays, delivering a clean smoke and eliminating the need for lighters or hemp wicks. The Trident comes with two ceramic smoke chambers, an adjustable silicone mouthpiece and a 3-year guarantee. Add a silicone hose for hookah style use. Available online.

A model shows the airtight vacuum sealing glass.

The airtight vacuum sealing jar from Staze.

Photo courtesy Staze

Staze airtight vacuum sealing jar Exposure to oxygen and light can accelerate the breakdown process of cannabis, resulting in a decrease in potency, aroma, and taste. Staze’s Airtight Vacuum Seal Jars protect the father’s herb by allowing him to purge the air from the slim container with a built-in hand pump that creates a tight vacuum seal. A carbon filter in the cap prevents odors from escaping. Available online individually or in sets of 3.

The vacuum-insulated smoking equipment stage Chill on a desk.

The vacuum-insulated smoker Chill.

Photo courtesy of Chill

Chill vacuum insulated smoker People have been putting ice cubes in their bongs for generations to create cool, clean smoke. The Chill takes this even further with a patented double-walled, vacuum-insulated construction that creates a protective shield to keep heat out and keep the water cold for hours. The two-part design and the threaded connection of Chill make cleaning easier and the patented ceramic interior makes the experience like a high-quality piece of glass. Available online in a variety of designs or create a custom look with the mix and match selection of bases and neck pieces.

The subscription box for cannabis accessories from El Primo from Daily High Club.

The subscription box for cannabis accessories from El Primo from Daily High Club.

Photo courtesy of the Daily High Club

Daily high club Subscription gift boxes for cannabis accessories from Daily High Club are the proverbial gift that has been given away again and again and reinvented for marijuana smokers. Each monthly box contains a selection of high quality accessories put together by smoking experts. Choose from the Connoisseur V2 with seven to nine products in each box or enlarge it with the limited El Primo box. Dad only smokes joints? Choose the Rawsentials package with Raw rolling papers, filter tips and lighter. Available online.

The heated Puffco Hot Knife cannabis concentrate loading tool is used to fill a vaporizer.

The heated Puffco Hot Knife loading tool for cannabis concentrate.

Photo courtesy Puffco

Puffco hot knife Cannabis concentrates are becoming increasingly popular, but their viscosity and stickiness make them difficult to handle. The Puffco Hot Knife simplifies the process and serves as a dab tool for loading the rig. After you have picked up some rosin or wax with the ceramic tip, it is heated by pressing the button so that the concentrate can easily slide into the bowl or the banger. No more dirty dabbing tools, sticky residue on clothing or surfaces, or wiping concentrates off the rim of the bowl. Comes with a USBC charging cable. Available online.

The Hydrology9 NX vaporizer from Cloudious9.

The Hydrology9 NX vaporizer from Cloudious9.

Photo courtesy of Cloudious9.

Hydrology9 NX vaporizer Dads who like cannabis flowers and extracts will enjoy the Hydrology9 NX by Cloudious9, a modular water-filtered vaporizer for both the concentrate connoisseur and the flower lover. With a switchable concentrate sprayer and a hybrid convection flower heating chamber, the Hydrology9 NX was developed to bring out the unique evaporation properties of each material. Available online.

Kids of Cannabis, a children's book by IB Sekandi.

Kids of Cannabis, a children’s book by IB Sekandi.

Photo courtesy of the author.

Children of cannabis (children’s book) Author IB Sekandi says he wrote Kids of Cannabis: My mom and dad work with cannabis; This is our story to help parents get into a conversation with their children, families and friends about cannabis and the stigma of working in the industry. Kids of Cannabis is a story about three children, Jack, Charlotte and Bruce, whose parents work in the CBD industry. Due to the persistent cannabis stigma, Jack, Charlotte and Bruce have never told any of their friends what their parents do for a living. Illustrated by Anna T. Available online.

The anti-twist bong from Sour Glass.

The anti-twist bong from Sour Glass.

Photo courtesy Sour Glass

Sour glass bongs and oil rigs San Diego-based Sour Glass is celebrating its 30th anniversary manufacturing high-quality, American-made hand-blown glass bongs and oil rigs, including the original, splash-free twist bong from 1991. Or choose from a variety of straight bongs, bubblers and oil rigs and accessories in various designs and colors. Available online at Twisted Glass House.

The Rainbow Sherbet MouthPeace from Moose Labs.

The Rainbow Sherbet MouthPeace from Moose Labs.

Photo courtesy of Moose Labs

Mouthpeace Moose Labs’ MouthPeace is the first doctor-sponsored, germ-retardant accessory designed to fit joints, glass pipes, vape pens and e-cigarettes for a cleaner smoking circle among friends. The Original MouthPeace and MouthPeace Mini form a hygienic barrier and prevent direct oral contact with a large number of shared smoking devices. Both variants are made of high quality platinum-cured silicone and come with proprietary filters that fit exactly into the device. The replaceable filters use activated carbon and triple layer filtration to remove resins, contaminants, and tar particles while allowing smaller molecules like THC and CBD to pass through. Available online. Fathers who also celebrate LGBTQ Pride this month will love the new Rainbow Sherbet MouthPeace, with 10% of all proceeds donated to The Trevor Project in June.

The cover of Willie Nelson's Letters to America.

The cover of Willie Nelson’s Letters to America.

Image courtesy Harper Horizon

Willie Nelson’s Letters to America (Book)

Country music icon and father of seven Willie Nelson is also America’s favorite cannabis aficionado and activist. In his new book, Willie Nelsons Letters to America, the red-haired stranger recalls his 65-year career, including his relationship with marijuana.

“Sometimes people ask me how much of yours I’ve smoked, but there is no answer,” he writes in “Dear Cannabis,” a letter to the herb itself. “We’ve been friends for so long, we just smoke each other , get us high and open up to the possibilities of now. I finally managed to write a love song about both of us. “

Other cannabis-related entries include the lyrics to “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die” and a letter to Woody Harrelson in which he mentions, “I think we’ve had a forest of marijuana together since the first joint on the bus burned down “. in LA “Willie Nelson’s Letters to America (co-authored by Turk Pipkin) from Harper Horizon is only available two weeks after Father’s Day on June 29th and can now be pre-ordered online.

The post Father's Day Gift Tips: The 11 Best Cannabis Accessories - Forbes first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Planning a road trip? These 10 post-pandemic destinations are within 5 hours of Sacramento – Sacramento Bee https://fromnews.info/planning-a-road-trip-these-10-post-pandemic-destinations-are-within-5-hours-of-sacramento-sacramento-bee/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 18:33:25 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7976 Planning a road trip? These 10 post-pandemic destinations are within 5 hours of Sacramento

Two whales swam between a group of paddle boarders and kayakers near Avila Beach, California. Jeanette Trompeter More from the series Sacramento Reopening Guide This story is part of the Sacramento Reopening Guide, giving you everything you need to know as the state’s economy officially reopens June 15. Read more of the stories here: Expand […]

The post Planning a road trip? These 10 post-pandemic destinations are within 5 hours of Sacramento - Sacramento Bee first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Planning a road trip? These 10 post-pandemic destinations are within 5 hours of Sacramento

Two whales swam between a group of paddle boarders and kayakers near Avila Beach, California.

Two whales swam between a group of paddle boarders and kayakers near Avila Beach, California.

More from the series

Sacramento Reopening Guide

This story is part of the Sacramento Reopening Guide, giving you everything you need to know as the state’s economy officially reopens June 15. Read more of the stories here:

Expand All

For thousands of Northern Californians, this will be the summer of the road trip.

Tired of being pent up during the COVID-19 pandemic, but not quite ready to fly, they’re hitting the road for shorter vacations and day trips, many focused on a safe outdoorsy experience.

Where to go? Yes, there’s Lake Tahoe and Yosemite, Napa and Carmel. All of those are nice … and crowded.

Here are 10 other getaways within a five-hour drive of Sacramento that are delightful, each in their own way, and a little less congested.

On one of these trips, you can find yourself nearly nostril to nostril with wild bison in a hidden spot in an urban setting. On another, you’ll be serenaded by a tartan-clad bagpiper as the sun sets over coastal dunes. And, on a third, you’ll stroll among angled light shafts inside one of the most historic and beautiful covered wood bridges in the country.

Warning for late deciders: Make your reservations before you take off on these trips. Even “lesser-known” corners of the state, such as the lake district in “The Lost Sierra” of Plumas County, are, in fact, well known to their fans. And service industry businesses, notably restaurants, have struggled this summer to hire enough staff.

1. Coastal Marin County

Vacation theme: Wear wool in July!

Nutshell: When it’s sweltering in Sacramento, you can be ‘sweatering’ in cool coastal fog. This can be a single-day trip, or an overnighter. Your circuit may include: Stinson Beach, Mt. Tamalpais, Point Reyes Station, Tomales Point, Petaluma, Mill Valley, Muir Woods, Sausalito.

Travel time: On a good day, it’s less than two hours to Stinson Beach from Sacramento.

Hiking: Mountain and beach hikes abound north of the Golden Gate, including the epic Dipsea Trail which takes you across the grassy flanks and wooded ravines of Mt. Tam between Mill Valley and Stinson Beach.

Pubbing: The Pelican Inn, perched behind a hedgerow like a proper English countryside way station, has a quaint pub and restaurant, offering a cozy landing spot after hikes in the Muir Beach and Tennessee Valley areas.

Beaching: Statuesque Stinson is a great beach for strolling. Bolinas Lagoon at the north end is a scenic site for bird and seal watching.

Muir Woods: The park requires reservations for parking, which costs $8.50, but thankfully guarantees you a spot. The shuttle bus from remote parking sites is grounded due to COVID-19 until June 19.

Food: The Sand Dollar restaurant in Stinson Beach was closed as of early June. But the Parkside Cafe, next to the beach parking lot, is open. In Point Reyes Station, plenty of shops and eateries are open, including the legendary Bovine Bakery, the Side Street Kitchen, Cafe Reyes and the Cowgirl Creamery barn.

Point_Reyes_HA_181009_15 Tule elk graze in Drakes Bay near the Point Reyes Seashore on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. Hector Amezcua Sacramento Bee file

2. Lands End, San Francisco

Vacation theme: A walk on the wild side

Nutshell: Hike along San Francisco’s west edge wilderness amid wind-bent cypress trees above wave-dashed rocks on trails between Sutro Baths, Point Lobos, Lands End and China Beach. Farther north, trails take you along bluffs overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge.

Travel time: It’s about two hours to the Lands End parking lot at the west end of Geary Boulevard. The trailhead is at the north end of the parking lot. It’s about 1.5 miles to the Eagle’s Point lookout, where you get an oceanside view of the bridge.

Legion of Honor: You might then walk a short mile up the hill to contemplate Auguste Rodin’s “The Thinker” in the colonnaded courtyard of the Legion of Honor Museum. The museum itself is a work of art, and small enough for an easy visit.

Sutro Heights: For an elevated ocean view without a hike, the Sutro Heights bluff looms above the Cliff House across Point Lobos Avenue from the Lands End parking lot. There also may be easy parking on 48th Avenue.

Bring your bike: For now, the Great Highway section south of Golden Gate Park is bicycle-pedestrian only (currently being called the Great Walkway), as are several streets inside Golden Gate Park. Those areas are a bit south of the Lands End parking lot.

The bison!: In keeping with the “wild San Francisco” theme of this trip, go visit the bison herd that lives in Golden Gate Park. Their meadow enclosure is on JFK Drive, west of 36th Avenue. If the bison are grouped at the north end of the paddock, walk along the trail up there for a close encounter.

Food: Try the Beach Chalet restaurant on the Great Highway for reasons that go far beyond food. You get great ocean views via the picture windows on the second floor. The first floor has striking WPA-era art murals on the walls and a large diorama of the park.

10ZLhg.So.11.jpeg Fall colors in the Hope Valley, south of Lake Tahoe are reach their peak in October as aspen tree leaves – predominate in the area – turn from their summer green to yellow. Manny Crisostomo Sacramento Bee file

3. Hope Valley, Alpine County

Vacation theme: Rustic comfort

Nutshell: The tiniest California county has a blue sky as big as Montana, mountain meadow hiking trails, lakes and streams for fishing, hot springs for soaking, curving highways for motorcycling and yurts for glamping. Fall is good for the beautiful Aspen leaves.

Travel time: It’s one and one-half hours to the valley and two hours to Markleeville via highways 50 and 89. The more scenic route, Highway 88, takes two and one-half hours..

To do: A popular Carson Pass hike includes a section of the Pacific Crest Trail across mountain meadows to Fourth of July Lake. If you want to soak in Grover Hot Springs, it’s best to make reservations two days in advance, but they allow walk-ins if they haven’t reached their COVID-19 capacity. Picturesque Cutthroat Brewing Company resides in the 121-year-old Alpine Hotel in Markleeville.

To stay: Wylder Hope Valley resort (formerly Sorenson’s Resort) offers cute cabins, or a yurt or even a redone “Spartan” silver metal trailer.

Be aware: Some roads in the area will be closed or partially closed on July 17 for the Death Ride bicycle event.

HopeValley2.JPG Fall colors in the Hope Valley, south of Lake Tahoe are reach their peak in October as aspen tree leaves – predominate in the area – turn from their summer green to yellow. Randy Pench rpench@sacbee.com

4. Mono Lake, Mono County

Vacation theme: Archaeology 101 in an other-worldly setting.

Nutshell: Head back to the Old West in this secluded nook east of the Sierra, where you can canoe or kayak among the briny lake’s amazing tufa towers and visit Bodie State Historic Park, an Old West ghost town.

Travel time: Four hours to the town of Lee Vining via Highways 50, 89 and 395.

Bodie: The historic park and old west ghost town is largely open now, and should be in full operation by June 15.

Tufa towers: Take a guided kayak or canoe tour to learn about the lake’s unusual ecosystem. Walk the trail down to the lake from the Mono Basin Scenic Area Visitor Center. Also, visit the Mono Lake Committee information center and bookstore.

Bonus: You can link this with a Yosemite visit. Take scenic Tioga Road over the backside of the Sierra to Tuolumne Meadows and Yosemite National Park.

17nqtp.So.111.jpeg No matter what time of year you visit the Eastern Sierra, the weird tufa formations of Mono Lake are always an interesting destination. Merced Sun-Star file

5. Columbia, Tuolumne County

Vacation theme: Old West fun for the family

Nutshell: This is three stops in one, starting with Columbia State Historic Park. Unlike Bodie, Columbia has a theme park feel, but that makes it enjoyable for families with younger children. The look of the place is authentic, even with touristy stores, activities and restaurants.

Travel time: Slightly less than two hours.

For the kids: You can ride a stagecoach through picturesque terrain. And you can pan for gold.

For the parents: The nearby town of Murphys, on Highway 4, is pleasant for strolling, with wineries, restaurants and boutiques, and several underground caverns in the area to tour.

Big Trees: A little up the road from Murphys is Calaveras Big Trees, another family-style locale, where you can park and immediately be strolling amid majestic and inspiring Sequoias.

Cavern tours: Nearby Moaning Caverns announced in May it has reopened for tours. Mercer Caverns reported, as of late May, it was still closed, though.

ColumbiaSP.JPG The Bridgeport Covered Bridge stretches over the South Yuba River in Nevada County and is the longest wood-covered bridge in the country. Randall Benton Sacramento Bee file

6. Bridgeport Covered Bridge, Nevada County

Vacation theme: Photographers’ delight.

Nutshell: The Bridgeport Covered Bridge in the South Yuba River State Park is the longest single-span, wood-covered bridge in the United States. The shingled span with massive timber trusses is a gorgeous piece of architecture and a wonderful historic remnant of early California.

Travel time: One and a half hours from Sacramento via Highway 70. This could suffice as a day trip. There are nearby hikes on the Yuba River. Or, it can be combined with an overnight stay in the picturesque Nevada City and Grass Valley area a half-hour away.

To do: The bridge and the cobbled river serve as excellent photo subjects worthy of enlarging and hanging on your wall at home. There are a few swimming holes nearby.

Important warning: Don’t visit quite yet! Put this trip on your “future to-do” list. The bridge is closed and partially disassembled for now as the state finishes up a years’-long refurbishing program. The state and local residents essentially are saving the bridge from collapse, using most of the same historic timbers and construction techniques. There will be a grand reopening later this year, possibly as early as September. For updates, go to the state park bridge project page.

Hog crossing: The bridge was on the Virginia Turnpike wagon trail to and from the silver mines of Nevada. A one-horse buggy paid $1 to cross. Horse riders paid 50 cents. People on foot paid 25 cents. Hog owners paid 5 cents per hog.

IMG_IMG_RP_BRIDGEPORT_BR_2_1_V11ON32P_L40817920 The Bridgeport Covered Bridge stretches over the South Yuba River in Nevada County and is the longest wood-covered bridge in the country. Randy Pench Sacramento Bee file

7. Pacific Grove, Monterey County

Vacation theme: Relaxed sophistication.

Nutshell: Wedged between Monterey and Carmel, Pacific Grove is the more classic laid-back California coastal town of the three. Here, you get butterflies at the Monarch Grove Sanctuary, at least on a good year. You can visit otters in the bay and be visited by a bagpiper on the dunes. You can walk the Asilomar Coastal Trail, and play wind-blown links-style golf courses.

Travel time: Three-plus hours. Interstate 5 to Santa Nella is one route to avoid East Bay commuter traffic.

Tunes on the dunes: Have a drink at the outdoor patio and fire pits at the Inn at Spanish Bay. Be there by 5:45 p.m. That’s when the bagpiper marches up over dunes on the golf course to offer you a bit of Scottish entertainment.

Links-style golf: Play golf at the Pacific Grove Golf Links, which has a links-style back nine at a lot lower price than fancier nearby places such as Spanish Bay and Pebble Beach.

Go to sea: Rent a sea kayak and paddle out to the kelp beds to watch otters in the wild. The ocean, just off of Monterey’s Cannery Row next door, is often placid and enjoyable, even for beginner kayakers.

1eCuCT.So.4.jpg A bicyclist pedals past an extensive mural last month near Lovers Point in Pacific Grove, just west of Monterey. Randall Benton Sacramento Bee file

8. Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County

Vacation theme: Decompression, pure and simple.

Nutshell: This is the longest drive in the bunch, at 4 hours, 30 minutes, but it plants you on the Central Coast of California, which just feels different from both the state’s north and south coasts. Come here if your agenda is little more than reading books on the beach and toasting the sunset with a glass of wine.

Central coast vibe: Avila Beach is laid-back and quite tiny. You can also hole up in a rented bluffside house in nearby Cambria, buying your provisions in the town’s vibrant Main Street. Or you may find Cayucos, Pismo Beach or Morro Bay your style.

All of these areas offer that distinct vibe that says yes, it’s OK to just do nothing.

Stay: The Inn at Avila Beach is across the street from the beach with rooms overlooking the ocean. Nearby, tucked in the hills, is the Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort and Spa. Then there is the eclectic Madonna Inn and its assortment of unique, themed rooms.

Outings: You are a one-hour drive from Hearst Castle in San Simeon. The college town San Luis Obispo is 15 minutes away. Drive an hour south, and you’ll explore Santa Ynez Valley wineries and the distinctly Danish town of Solvang.

Alternatives: For those who just want to plant themselves on a patio overlooking the beach, but don’t want to drive that far: Pajaro Dunes north of Monterey offers a similar zen-style, curl-up-with-a-book vacation. Farther north, Dillon Beach in Marin County is a rustic and secluded beach getaway.

whale3.jpg Two whales swam between a group of paddle boarders and kayakers near Avila Beach over the weekend. Jeanette Trompeter

9. The Lost Sierra, Plumas County

Vacation theme: Mountain air.

Nutshell: This area, hidden way up north above Truckee, is called The Lost Sierra. A mile high, the Graeagle and Blairsden areas of Plumas County are untrampled compared to the Tahoe Basin, but the granite-studded area claims 50 mountain lakes for recreation.

Travel Time: It’s a 2.5 hour drive, with a stop in old town Truckee for food and shopping.

Golf: Plumas Pines is the most challenging course. But there are plenty of others. While you hunt for birdies, you’re liable to see an osprey hunting for fish.

The Lakes Region: This secluded mountain area is popular for camping, boating, hiking.

Hikes: Sierra Buttes Lookout Trail is a thigh-buster with the requisite impressive views from the top. A popular and very easy hike, more of a stroll, is the mile path to Frazier Falls.

Food: The Iron Door restaurant in Johnsonville is described as “refined rustic.” The Brewing Lair near Blairsden has craft beers on tap on a timbered hillside with musicians playing on the dog-friendly patio on summer weekends. A few miles west of town, the Gray Eagle Lodge just reopened for overnight stays. Make reservations for old-school dinners above the creek.

plumas 3 Plumas Pines Golf Resort is one of many courses in the Graeagle area. Sam McManis smcmanis@sacbee.com

10. Lassen Volcanic National Park, Shasta County

Vacation theme: Volcano adventure experience.

Nutshell: This is Northern California’s version of Yellowstone National Park, with hot hissing sulfurous fumaroles in places with atmospheric names like Bumpass Hell, Devils Kitchen and Boiling Springs Lake.

Travel time: It’s slightly more than three from Sacramento to the parking lot at Lassen Peak.

Camping and lodging: Sites open for reservations on a daily basis online.

Drakesbad Guest Ranch: This out-of-the-way nook offers a family getaway from all things electronic. There are cabins and camping sites. Drakesbad has a chef who makes very good group meals daily. The hot-spring swimming pool was closed during COVID-19, with no firm opening date yet set.

Summit the volcano: You can hike 2.5 miles to the summit of Mt. Lassen, an exhilarating top-of-the-world type of experience. The switch-back hike is usually relatively easy for seasoned hikers, but it can be challenging for some, given the altitude, and tricky if there is snow is on the trail. Bring hiking poles for stability, especially on snowy sections, and a parka in case of cold winds at the top.

RP LASSEN_canoe Chaos Crags, top left, and Lassen Peak, with snow at right, loom over the occupants of a canoe on Manzanita Lake in Lassen Volcanic National Park on July 7, 2006. Randy Pench Sacramento Bee file

Related stories from Sacramento Bee

Tony Bizjak has been reporting for The Bee for 30 years. He covers transportation, housing and development and previously was the paper’s City Hall beat reporter.

The post Planning a road trip? These 10 post-pandemic destinations are within 5 hours of Sacramento - Sacramento Bee first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
San Diego Weekend Guide: 11-13 June – A Wee Fair – Times of San Diego https://fromnews.info/san-diego-weekend-guide-11-13-june-a-wee-fair-times-of-san-diego/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 13:32:06 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7973 San Diego Weekend Guide: 11-13  June - A Wee Fair - Times of San Diego

Clutter your face – classic #fairgoals. Alexander Fune from San Diego recently had a triple Krispy Kreme burger from Chicken Charlie’s at a trade show. The classic San Diego event returns this year, but in miniature form. Photo by Chris Stone A reduced fair is still a fair, isn’t it? If there are farm animals, […]

The post San Diego Weekend Guide: 11-13 June - A Wee Fair - Times of San Diego first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
San Diego Weekend Guide: 11-13  June - A Wee Fair - Times of San Diego

Clutter your face – classic #fairgoals. Alexander Fune from San Diego recently had a triple Krispy Kreme burger from Chicken Charlie’s at a trade show. The classic San Diego event returns this year, but in miniature form. Photo by Chris Stone

A reduced fair is still a fair, isn’t it? If there are farm animals, a few actors and of course artery blockers, we from the Weekend Guide decide – it’s a fair!

Call it what you like – the organizers of the San Diego County Fair called it Home * Grown * Fun, but it opens at 11 a.m. on Friday where the fair is always – the Del Mar Fairgrounds, which runs through Nov. Lasting July weekly event offers “a taste of what San Diegans has come to love about the annual fair,” but with just 35 food stalls, 280 shop vendors, pony rides, a magician, racing pigs and lots of activities for kids. $ 10 tickets must be purchased online, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am to 9pm

Virtual Reality puts you right in the middle of the story, and Traveling While Black presents an uncomfortable one – the experience of black Americans who have encountered barriers in their travels. Book a slot thanks to Wonderspaces to see the Emmy-nominated short film at Liberty Station from Friday to Sunday. Tickets are $ 12, with multiple discounts.

Mainly Mozart opens his week-long all-star event on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. at the Del Mar Surf Cup Sports Park. Dozens of classical musicians, not only from the San Diego Symphony, but also the New York Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra and Los Angeles Philharmonic will perform. Opening evening with works by Beethoven and Mozart. On Saturday it’s Ravel, Haydn and Mozart. Tickets start at $ 49.

Most of our favorite artists still can’t come to us, but the Florida Georgia Line country duo will be showing Saturday at 11.30pm at South Bay Drive-In in San Diego. For $ 74, up to six people per car can enjoy the late night show. Also see guests Nelly and Chase Rice.

The Women’s Museum of California at Liberty Station is hosting the San Diego Women’s Virtual Film Festival this month. Three women-directed films will be shown, with the opener Mu and the Vanishing World – about a refugee in Thailand – showing until Tuesday. Sisters Rising – about six Indian women – is available until June 22nd. The passes are $ 30 or $ 15 for a demonstration.

The East Village Gastropub Knotty Barrel celebrates its 10th anniversary on Sunday and it becomes a circus. Hey we mean business It’s really. From 12 noon to 5 p.m., the owners run a petting zoo, provide live music and be brave! – even a handheld reader. Do you need more fair food? There will also be funnel cake and cotton candy. Better still – all for free.

The San Diego Black Artist Collective starts a week-long June celebration, the Say It Out Loud Festival, on Sunday at 6:00 p.m. The opening night in the Flower Fields in Carlsbad features music, plays and poetry readings, as well as a performance by the Buffalo Soldier Mounted Cavalry Unit. Several theaters are collaborating on the festival, including New Village Arts, Moxie, Diversionary, and San Diego Rep.

Show annotations

The post San Diego Weekend Guide: 11-13 June - A Wee Fair - Times of San Diego first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Review of Pamela Haag’s “Revise: The Scholar-Writer’s Essential Guide to Tweaking, Editing and Perfecting Your Manuscript” (Opinion) – Inside Higher Ed https://fromnews.info/review-of-pamela-haags-revise-the-scholar-writers-essential-guide-to-tweaking-editing-and-perfecting-your-manuscript-opinion-inside-higher-ed/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 08:31:02 +0000 https://fromnews.info/?p=7967 Review of Pamela Haag's "Revise: The Scholar-Writer's Essential Guide to Tweaking, Editing and Perfecting Your Manuscript" (Opinion) - Inside Higher Ed

Complaints about academic prose are nothing new. An article that appeared in the journal Studies in the Renaissance in 1965 identified a Zinger who, in one form or another, might have appeared in one of the numerous books that between the 15th to express it was obscure. He’s like the octopus that wraps itself in […]

The post Review of Pamela Haag's "Revise: The Scholar-Writer's Essential Guide to Tweaking, Editing and Perfecting Your Manuscript" (Opinion) - Inside Higher Ed first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>
Review of Pamela Haag's "Revise: The Scholar-Writer's Essential Guide to Tweaking, Editing and Perfecting Your Manuscript" (Opinion) - Inside Higher Ed

Complaints about academic prose are nothing new. An article that appeared in the journal Studies in the Renaissance in 1965 identified a Zinger who, in one form or another, might have appeared in one of the numerous books that between the 15th to express it was obscure. He’s like the octopus that wraps itself in its own ink when it tries to contain itself. “

The analogy was originally coined by a sarcastic Platonist in the second century AD, but it really took off from critics of Aristotle during the Renaissance. Charles B. Schmitt, the author of the paper, points out an ironic aspect of the lawsuit: what most scholars knew about the mollusk they had almost certainly learned from the work of Aristotle. “For the sake of self-defense and self-preservation,” wrote the Greek polymath, “octopuses have what is called their ink… when [one] is frightened and frightened, it creates this blackness and mud in the water, holding a shield in front of the body, as it were. “

Bringing Aristotle down while relying on Aristotle takes some chutzpah. Be that as it may, the squid trope proved irresistible to polemics. “After its introduction by an author into the repertoire of rhetorical weapons of the time,” says Schmitt, “it would not be surprising if it was repeated again and again by the opponents of Aristotelian philosophy.” He suggests that the real target was “the conservative Aristotelian of the universities”, rather than the figure whom Dante called “the master of all who know.”

Schmitt cites a rejection from the 19th century about “this now flimsy comparison”. But it didn’t go away, it just changed shape – became a general-purpose method of criticizing an opaque author, replacing the octopus with the more familiar figure of the octopus scurrying away in a cloud of ink.

An element of the list – the deliberate bypass – is implied either way. Pamela Haag knows better. As a development editor of scientific works, she has been a consultant to university publishers and has given editorial guidance to monograph authors while also publishing her own books and articles, scientific and others. Experience has given her a thorough grasp of how manuscripts can go sideways – and what can be done about it. Your Revise: The Scholar-Writer’s Essential Guide to Tweaking, Editing, and Perfecting Your Manuscript (Yale University Press) is in the format of a manual, including a comprehensive but focused checklist for performing a “style check” on a draft. But it is as much an essay as a manual. You can and probably should read it more than once – in whole or in part.

“Scientific writing is inherently a challenge,” admits Haag, “but sometimes, for the wrong reasons, you write it even more opaque than necessary. In fact, scholarly prose is probably the only branch of the non-fiction family where one might strive not to be entirely clear. “The sensibility here is a world away from Strunk and White, whose classic The Elements of Style resembles Moses’ stone tablets that with “You’re not supposed to.” She admits that text can be as difficult to read as it needs to be. It is also possible to win the lottery, but probably best for everyone involved not to head for it leave.

The problem is not jargon as such that is inevitable. Each group with a common activity or interest develops its own language that is necessarily unknown, if not incomprehensible, to outsiders – and all too easily taken for granted by the initiated. A jargon “can become such a familiar short form,” writes Haag, “that you have the feeling that you have argued with the term alone … [rendering it] a crutch in your mind even before you even start writing. “It works” as a proxy for an argument or as a trapdoor to make one. “

It is a delicate duty for an editor to point out that this has happened without sounding reproachful. Authors revising a manuscript have the equally or more difficult task of recognizing and emphasizing their own over-reliance on discursive abbreviations and weird strategies for preserving the face. Because the problem with unrevised academic prose is, to use Haag’s own beautifully inverted jargon, “Psycho-Editorial”: a scholar’s research and insight are broken by a fear of demonstrating authority by reacting preventively to anyone who could question them. Revision implies a certain amount of soul searching, typically with the added pressure of meeting a deadline.

Revise contains both and extensive catalog of tendencies in academic writing worth revising and numerous examples of how Haag would approach them. At no point does the expression “dumb” apply. A handbook of psycho-editorial advice is scattered throughout the text in various places without any impact. “Instead of writing to appease your inner critic,” she notes, “sometimes you could write to confuse him, to throw him off course.” Revise can only have been written by someone who was there but escaped.

Here is a confessional passage from the book I gratefully quote for Inside Higher Ed’s removal of the comment section:

“I had an editor,” recalls Haag, “who once accused me of resorting to ‘academic obscurantism’ in order to avoid clear arguments, and that was a legitimate criticism. In my case, I was afraid of being shot by a man to become a member of the NRA, so maybe I wanted to make my argument about the arms industry so historically precise and circumscribed that it becomes harmlessly curious … So on certain topics I understand why the scholar-author may unconsciously seek refuge in the dark. The alternative – very clearly understood – could be worse. “

The squid has its reasons.

The post Review of Pamela Haag's "Revise: The Scholar-Writer's Essential Guide to Tweaking, Editing and Perfecting Your Manuscript" (Opinion) - Inside Higher Ed first appeared on FROM NEWS.

]]>